What Is the Good News of Yeshua? (Part 16)

Faulty, frail, imperfect Israel had long been waiting at the foot of God’s mountain. There, He brought Heaven to earth in preparation for the journey—and the purpose—of their lives. Through the giving of the commands, the construction of the Tent, and the creation of the priesthood, God introduced His people to the means for the remediation of sin. Not only would it form the foundation for their forgiveness, but the bloody basis for the atonement and reconciliation of the world. Read more

What Is the Good News of Yeshua? (Part 15)

The God of Israel requires blood for sin because “the life of the flesh is in the blood” (17:11) and “the wages of the sin is death” (Romans 6:23). Inasmuch as sin, disobedience, and violation of God’s commands incur a deathly deficit, the God of Atonement has assessed that that debt can only be paid with life. This is why “it is the blood which makes atonement for the soul” (Leviticus 17:11). Yet in order for sinners to be saved from paying with their own lives, the merciful, covenantal Creator provided a remedy whereby the blood from a sinless life could be accepted as payment for another’s sins. And since, among mere men, “there is none righteous, not even one” (Romans 3:10), God allowed for the substitution of blameless, spiritless animals to be that surrogate life. But because of the nature of those “same sacrifices that they continually offer” (Hebrews 10:1), such work could only ever serve as a reminder (Hebrews 10:3) that the problem of sin cannot be solved… not as long as the mediator—who has sin of his own—must use “the blood of others” to make atonement (Hebrews 9:25). For no matter how many innocent animals are slaughtered, “it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins” forever (Hebrews 10:4). And yet, this is not even the biggest problem where it comes to sin… Read more

When believers in Yeshua say that they’re “Messianic,” what exactly do they mean? Does it mean they hold strange, unbiblical beliefs? Does it represent a profound, scriptural understanding of the faith not embraced by traditional Christianity? Could it be a combination of both? In this episode, Kevin explores the origins and meaning of the word “messianic,” both from a biblical perspective, and from his perspective as a Messianic Jew.

What Is the Good News of Yeshua? (Part 14)

As the first anniversary of the Exodus drew near, while Israel remained at the mountain, God proceeded to detail through Moses the patterns and particulars of the priestly, propitiatory order (Leviticus 1:1ff). Serving also as food for the priests, the edible offerings brought by the people often included various combinations of grain, flour, bread, oil, spice, salt and wine. Yet most of the different types of offering-payments were mainly those of animal sacrifice, ranging from the less expensive turtledoves or pigeons to the larger and increasingly more costly sheep, goats and bulls. The people were invited to make voluntary offerings as acts of devotion to express thankfulness (7:12) or to make a vow (7:16). But when God’s commands were broken—resulting in sin—only a sin offering would suffice. Read more

Passover is perhaps the most widely observed Jewish holiday, carrying with it thousands of years of history and rich tradition. And yet, most of what is typically observed today in the central ceremony of Passover—the Passover Seder—isn’t biblical. Despite any modern innovations and adaptations (including Messianic ones) most of the elements of the Passover Seder, as long established by post-Temple rabbinic Judaism, sadly have no basis in Scripture. Read more

Passover is perhaps the most widely observed Jewish holiday, carrying with it thousands of years of history and rich tradition. And yet, most of what is typically observed today in the central ceremony of Pesach—the Passover Seder—isn’t biblical. In this episode, Kevin seeks to elevate the the written word of God by considering the origins of the traditional food elements on the Seder plate, and then offering a scriptural alternative to the traditional Seder.

What Is the Good News of Yeshua? (Part 13)

The Creator of the universe had made His choice: humanity’s national facilitator of reconciliation would be the groaning, ungrateful, stiff-necked people of Israel. In fulfillment of His covenant with the patriarchs, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob had delivered His holy people through astonishing feats of power, and given them His commands of love with the sobering assurance of either abundant mercy or glorious wrath. In terrifying displays of authority, the God of Commandments—through His faithful law-giver Moses—made clear Israel’s objective and definition as a distinctive treasure among all the nations. As His priestly servant and mediator, God required Israel’s faithful submission and obedience to His word. But for the people of Israel to fulfill their uniquely ordained mission of helping to save the world, they first needed to be shown the method and the means of dealing with their own sin, and to find the way of righteousness that would accomplish their own reconciliation.

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The Bible claims that Yeshua is the Son of God, but how can the eternal Creator of the universe have a son? Did He mix with humanity to father biological offspring? Or maybe replicate His essence through some kind of cosmic reproduction? No, the reality and sense in which the God of Israel can have a Son—and for that Son to be Yeshua—is nothing like anything any mere mortal could conceive. And though it defies comprehension, it was through this embodiment of Himself that God decided—from the beginning—He would not only restore Israel, but bring salvation to the world.

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The Bible claims that Yeshua is the Son of God, but how can the eternal Creator of the universe—the God of Israel—have a son? In this episode, Kevin explains from a Jewish perspective how the Hebrew Scriptures point to Yeshua as the Son of God, how the New Covenant Scriptures expound on that view, and the meaning that’s wrapped up in this most important title of the Messiah.

As surprising as it may seem, most Jewish people know very little truth about God, the Bible, and especially the most important Jew of all time: Yeshua. Much of what is taught in Judaism is filtered through extra-biblical, rabbinical writings, as well as centuries of Jewish philosophy and tradition. And sadly, where Yeshua is concerned, misinformation and denial is the norm.

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